Monday, January 24, 2011

CSFF Blog Tour: Dragons of the Valley



Dragons of the Valley, Donita K. Paul, Waterbrook Multnomah, Fantasy, 2010, 370 pages.

Synopsis: With an invasion of her country imminent, Tipper Schope is drawn into a mission to keep three important statues from falling into the enemy’s clutches. Her friend, the artist Bealomondore, helps her execute the plan, and along the way he learns to brandish a sword rather than a paintbrush.

As odd disappearances and a rash of volatile behavior sweep Chiril, no one is safe. A terrible danger has made his vicious presence known: The Grawl, a hunter unlike any creature encountered before.

To restore their country, Tipper, Bealomondore, and their party must hide the statues in the Valley of the Dragons and find a way to defeat the invading army. When it falls to the artistic Bealomondore to wield his sword as powerfully and naturally as a paintbrush, will he answer Wulder’s call for a champion?


My thoughts: Honestly, I wasn’t expecting a lot, and my expectation was right, in a way. The plot wanders, and it’s hard to tell where it will go next, even though you think you know where it will end up. A lot of time often passed between chapters, without being hinted at, and that was confusing. The only character not revealed much was Tipper, even though she seemed to be the main character.

The other characters, however, were where I was wrong. I really, really enjoyed them! They are what drove this story. Wizard Fenworth’s absent-minded way of things kept me laughing, Hollee’s cheerful inquiries brightened my mood, Lady Peg’s meandering, critical speech bewildered and fascinated me, and Rayn’s antics had me wishing I had a minor dragon of my own! If you don’t mind a vague plot, and prefer good and interactive characters, this is the book for you!


*I received this book free from Waterbrook Multnomah in conjunction with the CSFF Blog Tour. I was not required to write a positive review, and the opinions expressed are my own.*

My rating: 4 stars

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Upcoming reviews
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Participating bloggers
    Gillian Adams
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    Red Bissell
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    Grace Bridges
    Beckie Burnham
    Keanan Brand
    Morgan L. Busse
    CSFF Blog Tour
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    D. G. D. Davidson
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    Bruce Hennigan
    Becky Jesse
    Cris Jesse
    Jason Joyner
    Julie
    Carol Keen
    Dawn King
    Emily LaVigne
    Shannon McDermott
    Matt Mikalatos
    Rebecca LuElla Miller
    Joan Nienhuis
    John W. Otte
    Donita K. Paul
    Sarah Sawyer
    Chawna Schroeder
    Tammy Shelnut
    Kathleen Smith
    James Somers
    Fred Warren
    Phyllis Wheeler
    Dave Wilson


    5 comments:

    1. Hey, Noah, good observation about Tipper. The book that preceded this one, The Vanishing Sculptor was really Tipper's story, so those of us who had read that one didn't need a lot to understand and know where she was coming from. But for someone reading this one first, I'm sure it would seem odd that the main character didn't receive more attention.

      Right on about Wizard Fenworth, Lady Peg, Hollee (all the kimens really) and the minor dragon. I think wonderful characters like those make all Donita's books.

      Becky

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    2. Well, I'm glad you liked the characters. Did you perhaps learn anything about our walk with God during the meandering plotline?

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    3. Despite the back cover copy, it seemed to me that the primary character was really Bealomondore. Certainly, he underwent significant transformation over the course of the novel.

      I agree with you about the characters--they always make me smile!

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    4. I agree Bealomondore seemed like the main character, actually. Mrs. Paul's characters are always interesting!

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    5. I perfectly understand why some people don't like her books. For me
      they are great books to read on a snowy day. When I need cheering up
      and want it. (when I'm depressed these books might bug me) her
      writting style is rather free, fun, relaxing. It makes me want to
      smile and laugh.
      According to my normal preferences I shouldn't like her books but I do. The cheer in to books get me, I just can't explain it.

      I see were you are coming from and I'm agree with what you said. Just for me I for some unknown reason can easily over look it.

      Good review though!

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